Easy BBQ Pork Lo Mein
Noodles,  Pork

Easy BBQ Pork Lo Mein

If you’ve avidly read through our Noodle Types page, then you’d know which noodle speaks directly my soul. It’s a matter of magical mystery as soon as I bite into springy, al dente egg noodles from this Easy BBQ Pork Lo Mein. You can bet that most of the time I’m more than happy to just let my flavour-hungry taste buds do the appreciating. 

I must admit, lo mein isn’t a dish my family grew up eating often. While ridiculously simple to whip up, Mum and Dad only ever made it when they were either really strapped for time OR when picky kids at parties were involved (I know what you’re thinking…and no, not my brother and I). 

Lo mein is just one of those culinary wonders that your food-loving subconscious will drag out from your childhood memory bank and demand to be made again. No matter how you find yourself thinking about a plate of lo mein, it deserves a special place in your recipe book. 

You’ll definitely find it in mine. 

Whether egg noodles are immersed in a delightful broth like our Wonton Egg Noodle Soup or exploding with vividly bold flavours found in this Easy BBQ Pork Lo Mein, there’s no saying where your egg noodle adventures will take you!

Thick egg noodles
Thin vs thick egg noodle

What are lo mein noodles?

‘Mein’ in Chinese simply means noodle. But wait a minute…aren’t there many types of noodles? 

You’re absolutely right. While mein means noodle, it specifically refers to EGG noodle. That is, noodles made of eggs and wheat flour. It has a very similar ingredient list as Italian pasta. So the next time you’re at a Chinese restaurant and see or hear the dish being referred to as ‘mein’, you can be confident that you’re getting egg noodles!

It then gets further categorised into thin and thick egg noodles. I personally prefer thicker egg noodles for lo mein because its width soaks up all the sauce, but there’s nothing to say that you can’t use the thin version.

What's the difference between lo mein and chow mein?

Lo mein and chow mein have one thing in common: they both use egg noodles as their base. The main difference, really, comes down to the cooking technique. 

‘Lo’ in lo mein refers to tossing. Think of those get-your-hands-in-and-mix type dishes, the ones where your hands are covered in sticky sauce afterwards. The sauce tends to ‘sit’ then get absorbed into the noodle because the cooking process is a lot simpler and doesn’t involve heat. 

Chow mein, on the other hand, means stir fry noodles. The ‘chow’ in chow mein translates to ‘stir fry’. If we put them together, you literally get stir fried noodles. Surprise

When people talk about ‘wok hei’ (or breath of the wok), chow mein is one of those dishes that taste exponentially better with that smokey char you can only get with stir frying.

BBQ pork
Choy sum

What you'll need to make this easy bbq pork lo mein

I’ll be using my favourite lo mein ingredients, but you can make it however you like. The best thing to remember about lo mein is that you can substitute the meat and vegetables for anything you like. Here are some ideas:

Meat: chicken, beef, seafood, pork, tofu (for the vegetarians) or eggs.

Vegetables: capsicum, carrots, brocolli, snow peas, onions, bok choy or Chinese brocolli.

For this recipe, I like to use:

  • 1 bag thick egg noodles
  • 2 BBQ pork strips (I buy it directly from the Chinese BBQ shop)
  • 2 bundles choy sum (or cheng gua choy)
  • 6 eggs
  • fried onions (for garnishing)

What you'll need for the sauce

What lo mein sauce consists of varies from family to family. In our household, this is what we use:

Now that we’ve got all the ingredients, let’s get cooking!
Egg noodles on a plate
Microwaving the egg noodles

To start, we’ll prepare the egg noodles. As we did in the Wonton Egg Noodle Soup recipe, there are a few important steps we’ll need to do for that springy al dente noodle. Of course, you’re more than welcome to skip these steps but I do recommend trying it out at least once.

Heat up a pot of water to cook the egg noodles.

While this is happening, divide your bag of noodles into halves or thirds. Spread one batch onto a microwave-safe plate and microwave it for 1 minute 30 seconds. This dehydrates the noodles and keeps it firmer as it cooks. Flip the noodles onto the other side and repeat for another 1 minute 30 seconds.

Ice bath

While the egg noodles are dehydrating in the microwave, set up an ice bath in a large bowl or in the sink. As soon as the noodles are cooked, you’ll be throwing them into the ice bath to immediately stop the cooking process. Remember, the longer it is exposed to heat, the softer it becomes.

Cooking the egg noodles
Run the egg noodles under cold water

How long you boil your egg noodles for is up to two factors: (1) the strength of your heat and (2) how soft or springy you like your noodles. I suggest you take a strand out every few minutes to test it. 

Once it’s almost to your liking, use a pasta ladle (or chopsticks) to transfer the noodles into a colander with cold water running.

Egg noodles in an ice bath

As soon as the noodles are cool to touch, I put it straight in for an ice bath. After a minute, take the noodles out to strain in a colander. I like to drizzle some sesame oil over it and give it a quick mix to stop the noodles from sticking to each other and also for added flavour. 

Repeat these steps to cook the rest of the noodles.

Choy sum in a colander

The noodles are cooking away now so it’s time to prepare the toppings! To start, separate each choy sum stalk and remove the tips of the leaves. Divide the choy sum into stems and leaves.

Wash them 2-3 times in lightly salted water and drain in a colander.

Stir frying choy sum stems

Heat up a wok or pan and add 2-3 tbsp of cooking oil. On a high heat, stir fry the stems for 3 minutes with 1/2 tsp of chicken bouillon powder

Choy sum leaves in a wok

After 2 minutes, add the leaves in along with 1/2 tsp of chicken bouillon powder. As soon as the greens are cooked, plate it.

Lightly beaten eggs

While the pan is still hot, I like to work on the egg crepes. Lightly beat the eggs with 1 tsp chicken bouillon powder and 1 tbsp Squid brand fish sauce until combined.

Egg crepe cooking

Add 1 tbsp cooking oil into a hot pan and turn the heat to medium. Pour in some of the egg mix (I use a soup ladle to ensure they’re all roughly the same size) and swirl the egg around until there is a thin layer across the pan’s surface. You’re after something similar to a crepe.

Keep it on medium heat until the egg is no longer runny.

Folded egg crepe

If you have the skill to flip the egg onto the other side without touching it, this is where you work your magic. 

If you’re still learning (like me), use any utensil to fold the egg crepe onto itself from either side. This will help you flip it over and cook the top half.

Plate the cooked egg crepe then repeat until all the mixture is done.

Sliced pork on a plate
Sliced egg crepe on a plate

At this point, your toppings are all ready. The only thing left is to make the sauce and slice the bbq pork and eggs!

Lo mein sauce in a bowl

It’s sauce time!

In a bowl, combine the oyster sauce, light soy sauce, chicken bouillon powder, sugar and sesame oil.

Sauce cooking in a pan

Heat up a wok or small pot with a tbsp of cooking oil. Once it’s hot, pour the mixed sauce in and simmer for 2-3 minutes until the sugar has caramelised.

Egg noodles in a bowl

Now we begin the fun part! Okay…the whole recipe was fun, but this is where we get our hands dirty! Time to lo the mein!

Start off by putting some egg noodles in a large mixing bowl. I wear gloves for this, but chopsticks, forks or bare hands work just as well. You do you.

Sauce on the egg noodles
Mixing the noodles and sauce

Add 2-3 tbsp of sauce onto the egg noodles and mix thoroughly. 

Toppings in with the egg noodles

Throw in a handful of BBQ pork, egg, choy sum and fried onion then mix until well incorporated. Give the noodles a taste to see if it needs more sauce or more noodle.

Repeat this step until all the noodles, sauce and toppings are combined. 

If you like it with a kick, drizzle some chilli oil or Sriracha over it, otherwise it’s good to enjoy as is!

Easy BBQ Pork Lo Mein
Easy BBQ Pork Lo Mein - If you've never had Lo Mein, try this EASY recipe that comes together in 30 minutes! Flavourful noodles, sweet and salty bbq pork and crunchy vegetables, it's sure to be any party hit!
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Easy BBQ Pork Lo Mein
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5 from 5 votes

Easy BBQ Pork Lo Mein

If you've never had Lo Mein, try this EASY recipe that comes together in 30 minutes! Flavourful noodles, sweet and salty bbq pork and crunchy vegetables, it's sure to be any party hit!
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Dinner, Lunch, Main Course
Cuisine: Cantonese, Chinese, Vietnamese
Keyword: asian food, bbq pork, chinese food, easy recipes, egg noodles, lo mein, wontons and egg noodles
Servings: 10
Author: Jeannette

Ingredients

  • 1 bag thick egg noodles
  • 2 strips BBQ pork I buy it directly from the Chinese BBQ shop
  • 2 bundles choy sum or cheng gua choy
  • 6 eggs
  • fried onions optional

For the sauce

Instructions

  • Heat up a pot of water to cook the egg noodles.
  • Divide your bag of noodles into halves or thirds. Spread one batch onto a microwave-safe plate and microwave it for 1 minute 30 seconds. 
  • Flip the noodles onto the other side and repeat for another 1 minute 30 seconds.
  • Set up an ice bath in a large bowl or in the sink. 
  • Put the microwaved noodles into the boiling pot of water.
  • Once it’s almost to your liking, use a pasta ladle (or chopsticks) to transfer the noodles into a colander with cold water running.
  • As soon as the noodles are cool to touch, I put it straight in for an ice bath. After a minute, take the noodles out to strain in a colander.
  • Drizzle some sesame oil over the noodles and mix it in to stop any clumping.
  • Repeat these steps to cook the rest of the noodles.
  • Separate each choy sum stalk and remove the tips of the leaves.
  • Wash the choy sum 2-3 times in lightly salted water and drain in a colander.
  • Heat up a wok or pan and add 2-3 tbsp of cooking oil. On a high heat, stir fry the stems for 3 minutes with 1/2 tsp of chicken bouillon powder
  • After 2 minutes, add the leaves in along with 1/2 tsp of chicken bouillon powder. As soon as the greens are cooked, plate it.
  • Lightly beat the eggs with 1 tsp chicken bouillon powder and 1 tbsp Squid brand fish sauce until combined.
  • Add 1 tbsp cooking oil into a hot pan and turn the heat to medium. Pour in some of the egg mix (I use a soup ladle to ensure they’re all roughly the same size) and swirl the egg around until there is a thin layer across the pan’s surface. Keep it on medium heat until the egg is no longer runny.
  • Use any utensil to fold the egg crepe onto itself from either side.
  • Plate the cooked egg crepe then repeat until all the mixture is done.
  • Thinly slice the BBQ pork and egg crepe.
  • In a bowl, combine the oyster sauce, light soy sauce, chicken bouillon powder, sugar and sesame oil.
  • Heat up a wok or small pot with a tbsp of cooking oil. 
  • Once the wok or small pot is hot, pour the mixed sauce in and simmer for 2-3 minutes until the sugar has caramelised.
  • In a large mixing bowl, put some egg noodles and 2-3 tbsp of sauce in. Mix until well combined.
  • Mix in a handful of BBQ pork, egg, choy sum and fried onion until well incorporated.
  • Give the noodles a taste to see if it needs more sauce or more noodle.
  • Repeat the mixing steps until all the noodles, sauce and toppings are combined. 
  • If you like it with a kick, drizzle some chilli oil or Sriracha over it, otherwise enjoy as is!

SHARE YOUR CREATION!

If you recreated this authentic recipe, I’d love to see it! Tag @wokandkin on Instagram with the hashtag #wokandkin! See you there!

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