Blood jelly on a plate
How-To's,  Pork

How to Cook Blood Jelly

I get it. When you think of jelly, you see that pristine colourful block of childhood wonder. So who on earth eats BLOOD jelly?

A lot of people, actually. Pork blood jelly is abundantly popular in Chinese cooking and has migrated to other cuisines, finding itself in many recipes such as Vietnamese Chicken Tapioca Noodle Soup (Bánh Canh Gà).

It’s not as horrible as it sounds, I assure you! When cooked well, it has a spring to each bite and tastes as rich as the broth it has been simmering in. 

I honestly thought about skipping this ingredient altogether, but hey, I promised AUTHENTIC recipes from our kitchen. So that’s what you’re getting. 

Still, if just the thought of it irks you, feel free to give it a miss in any of the dishes we mention it in!

Blood jelly held up by chopsticks

Is eating blood jelly good for you?

You’ll be surprised (or excited) to know that pork blood curd is HIGHLY dense in minerals and vitamins. Some of these include:

  • protein
  • iron
  • vitamin C
  • calcium

Just a word of caution though: don’t eat too much blood jelly. There is such a rich concentration of iron that it’s best to eat about twice a week at most.

How to cook blood jelly

First of all, let’s talk about where to get it. Our family source it straight from the nearby Asian butcher. It’s common enough to be easily accessible here in Australia and is generally sold cold in a plastic container. 

From the box, all it really needs is some salt, water and a quick boil to cook. So let’s get started!

Knife cutting through blood jelly in a box

Start by using a knife to gently cut the blood jelly into rectangular prisms. I like to go from top to bottom along the length and finish it with one line through the middle from left to right.

To ensure that each piece slides out of the container without breaking, run the knife along the box’s perimeter.

Uncooked blood jelly in a pot of water

Fill a small pot with enough water to completely cover all the blood jelly and season it with 1/2 tsp salt. 

Put the blood jelly in then turn the heat up to high without the pot lid.

Chopsticks in pot of cooking blood jelly

Occasionally give the blood jelly a gentle stir to stop it from sticking to the pot’s base. The water will begin to thicken.

Pot with lid

As soon as the water boils, turn the heat off and put the pot lid on. Let it sit for an hour on the stove to slowly cook further. This is the secret for the most velvet blood jelly experience.

Water running on blood jelly in a pot

Store the cooked blood jelly before adding it into any soup by filling the plastic container it came in with cold water.

Empty the pot’s contents into a sink with cold tap water running. 

Cooked blood jelly in a container of water

Carefully transfer the blood jelly back into the box.

The final step now is just to wait until the dish it’s to be served with is close to ready. If it’s a soup, drain and add the cooked blood into the pot to absorb all the flavour!

Cooked blood jelly on a plate
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Blood jelly on a plate
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5 from 4 votes

How to Cook Blood Jelly

If you can stomach the idea of eating blood jelly, you'll be one step closer to experiencing authentic Chinese and Vietnamese recipes! This how-to will show you all the tricks!
Prep Time2 mins
Cook Time1 hr 10 mins
Course: Dinner, Main Course, Side Dish
Cuisine: Asian, Chinese, Vietnamese
Keyword: asian food, blood curd, blood jelly, chinese food, pork blood jelly, Vietnamese food
Servings: 10
Author: Jeannette

Ingredients

  • 1 box blood jelly we get it from our local Asian butcher
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Instructions

  • Use a knife to gently cut the blood jelly into rectangular prisms. Go from top to bottom along the length and finish it with one line through the middle from left to right.
  • Run the knife along the box’s perimeter.
  • Fill a small pot with enough water to completely cover all the blood jelly and season it with 1/2 tsp salt. 
  • Put the blood jelly in then turn the heat up to high without the pot lid.
  • Occasionally give the blood jelly a gentle stir to stop it from sticking to the pot’s base as the water begins to thicken.
  • When the water boils, turn the heat off and put the pot lid on. Let it sit for an hour on the stove to slowly cook further. 
  • Store the cooked blood jelly before adding it into any soup by filling the plastic container it came in with cold water.
  • Empty the pot’s contents into a sink with cold tap water running. 
  • Carefully transfer the blood jelly back into the box.
  • Wait until the dish it’s to be served with is close to ready. If it’s a soup, drain and add the cooked blood into the pot to absorb all the flavour.

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Hello, I’m Jeannette!

I’ll be sharing recipes that will give you front row access to authentic Chinese and Vietnamese cuisines. Find out about how I discovered my love for cooking and who inspired it all here!

 

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